A Call to Advocacy

August is upon us and before you know it school will be back in session.

Is your child ready? Do you know the services they should receive related to their disability? Are you worried about beginning another year of uncertainty, missed goals, and limited progress?

We can help you navigate those murky waters called “Special Ed.”

Call us today if…

  • You feel your child may have a learning disability
  • You don’t understand the ins and outs of the (IEP), Individualized Education Plan
  • You want to know your rights as a parent
  • Need help writing a letter to the school
  • Don’t understand the evaluations process, percentiles, outcomes etc…
  • Feel your child should be making more progress in academics
  • The school seems to be fluffing you off, saying she/he will catch up

Special Needs NJ has been providing families with “special needs” members for over 15 years in the areas of IEP interpretation, letter writing, IDEA law review, evaluation and assessment interpretation, understanding timelines, everything up to and including meeting attendance with your (CST) Child Study Team. Giving you the skills, techniques, and guidance to help you become the “BEST” advocate you can be for your child.

We understand ALL of the classifying categories; ALL of the related services, and most importantly How you can get the best possible program for your child to progress and become successful in their educational experience.

DON’T WAIT ANOTHER MINUTE….

CALL (973) 534-3402 and we will give you a free consultation.

Statistics show that children who get the proper services during the formative years of Kindergarten-3rd grade perform beyond their expected potential. Unfortunately we see most students because they are struggling and by 3rd grade they are 2-3 years behind, by 5th grade they are 3-5 years behind, and by 8th grade they are moving into high school with only a 5th grade reading level!

However, don’t despair if your child is already in this situation… it’s NEVER too late!

call, email, or fill out the service form right here on our page.

Our prices are conservative and very reasonable

Isn’t your child’s future worth it?

 

SNNJ also provides: Tutoring, Life Skills Coaching, Behavior Management

Executive Functioning difficulties/disorder/disability? What?

Executive function is a set of mental processes that helps connect past experience with present action. People use it to perform activities such as planning, organizing, strategizing, paying attention to and remembering details, and managing time and space.

In school, at home or at work, we use executive functioning to:

  • Make plans
  • Keep track of time and finish work on time
  • Keep track of more than one thing at once
  • Meaningfully include past knowledge in discussions
  • Evaluate ideas and reflect on our work
  • Change our minds and make mid-course corrections while thinking,  reading and writing
  • Ask for help or seek more information when we need it
  • Engage in group dynamics
  • Wait to speak until we’re called on

A student may have problems with executive function when he or she has trouble:

  • Planning projects
  • Comprehending how much time a project will take to complete
  • Telling stories (verbally or in writing), struggling to communicate details in an organized, sequential manner
  • Memorizing and retrieving information from memory
  • Initiating activities or tasks, or generating ideas independently
  • Retaining information while doing something with it, for example, remembering a phone number while dialing

What to do if you suspect you or your child is having executive functioning problems:

There are many effective strategies to help with executive function challenges:
General Strategies

  • Take step-by-step approaches to work; rely on visual organizational aids.
  • Use tools like time organizers, computers or watches with alarms.
  • Prepare visual schedules and review them several times a day.
  • Ask for written directions with oral instructions whenever possible.
  • Plan and structure transition times and shifts in activities.

Managing Time

  • Create checklists and “to do” lists, estimating how long tasks will take.
  • Break long assignments into chunks and assign time frames for completing each chunk.
  • Use visual calendars at to keep track of long-term assignments, due dates, chores and activities.
  • Use management software such as the Franklin Day Planner, Palm Pilot or Lotus Organizer.
  • Be sure to write the due date on top of each assignment.

Managing Space and Materials

  • Organize work space.
  • Minimize clutter.
  • Consider having separate work areas with complete sets of supplies for different activities.
  • Schedule a weekly time to clean and organize the work space.

Managing Work

  • Make a checklist for getting through assignments. For example, a student’s checklist could include such items as: get out pencil and paper; put name on paper; put due date on paper; read directions; etc.
  • Meet with a teacher or supervisor on a regular basis to review work; troubleshoot problems.

For specific help for your family member suffering from Executive functioning disorders/problems, contact Special Needs NJ (973) 534-3402

 

The ABC’s of Special Education

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 Anatomy of a Special Needs Child

18.5% of American Children under 18 are special needs students.That doesn’t mean they aren’t smart, talented, or capable. Just that they have specific challenges that a “normal” student wouldn’t face.

There are four major types of special needs children.

1.)Physical– Muscular Dystrophy, Multiple Sclerosis, Chronic Asthma, Epilepsy, etc.
2.) Developmental–Down syndrome, autism, dyslexia, processing disorders.
3.)Behavioral/Emotional–ADD, Bipolarism, Oppositional Defiance Disorder
4.)sensory impaired–Blind, visually impaired, deaf, limited hearing.

Here’s our guide on how to identify and care for special needs children.

The basics

Is your child being treated humanely?               Know your rights:
The IDEA Act (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act):
–Students with disabilities must be prepared for further education, employment, and independent living.
–If a child’s strength, endurance, or stamina cannot keep up with school activities, they can qualify for “other health impaired” special education status.
Section 504 of the rehabilitation Act:
–Prohibits schools from discriminating against children with disabilities.
–Requires schools to provide accommodations for disabled students.
–Students with impairments that substantially limit a major life activity can qualify as disabled (learning and social development deficits too).
Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA):
–Schools must meet the needs of children with psychiatric problems.
No Child Left Behind
–Schools must uphold achievement standards for children with disabilities.

Core Concepts

IEP, (or Individualized Education Program) is a legally binding document spelling out what special education services your child will receive and why. Includes classification and accommodations.
Classification: One of 13 different disability classes that qualify for special education services. Including: visual impairment, speech and language impairment, auditory impairment. deaf/blind, Autism, developmental disabilities, multiple disabilities, orthopedic impairment, Specific learning disabilities, emotional/behavioral disorder, traumatic brain injury, multi-sensory impairment, and serious health impairment.
Accommodations: a change in timing, presentation, formatting, setting, etc… that will allow the student to complete normal classwork.
Modification: an adjustment to an assignment that a special needs child is not expected to complete at a normal level.

Types of Special Needs

Special Physical Needs

Whether you already know, or just believe your child may have special medical needs, finding the proper medical professionals greatly enhances your ability to take care of your children.

Choosing a doctor:
Location: if your child requires regular visits, you won’t want to drive for hours to specialist.
Demeanor: you want someone non-threatening (particularly to younger children) who is understanding towards special needs accommodations.
Insurance Help: Larger practices generally have more experience with expediting insurance procedures and being your advocate.
Availability: Something to balance with quality of service. You will probably need notes for teachers, school administrators, and others, and want to have an easily accessible doctor.
Quality of service: Perhaps the most important criterion. Set up a 10-15 minute “meeting” so you can gauge the Doctor’s knowledge about your child’s conditions.

Types of Special Physical Needs

Allergies and Asthma: 1/5
Juvenile Arthritis:1/1000
Leukemia: Very rare
Muscular Dystrophy: 1/35,000
Sight Impaired:
Multiple Sclerosis: 1/750
Hearing Impaired:

Tips for dealing with medical needs

1.) See if your child qualifies for “other health impaired” placement in special ed.
a.) Other health impaired (according to Federal Regulation) includes children who have “limited strength, vitality, or alertness, including to environmental stimuli.”

Allergies and Asthma– Are the same in children as in adults, only children have less maturity and emotional resources than adults to deal with them.

Tips:
1.) Explain to children what they are allergic to.
2.) Alert school personnel as to the conditions and provide medicines.
3.) Work with school personnel to make accommodations.
a.) Substitute another activity for recess on high pollen count days.
b.) Make sure that caretakers schedule symptom inducing activities around when a child will be in the area.
c.) Tailor coursework to provide emotional and explanatory support for the child’s condition.

Juvenile Arthritis

–Education is often interrupted during long “flare-ups” of juvenile arthritis. Here’s what you can do to promote healthy development.
1.) Establish an IEP or 504 plan with educators to ensure that your child’s rights are protected.
a.) The IDEA act (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) outlines a special needs child’s rights in education.
2.) If the students strength, endurance, or stamina is affected obtain a note from a physician to see if your child qualifies for special education under “other health impaired.”
3.) Contact the hospital or homebound coordinator for your district if your child is frequently missing large periods of school.
4.) Frequent communication between parents and teacher ensures the teacher knows the student’s current medical status and can adapt lessons accordingly.
5.) Proper ergonomics in the classroom are particularly important for children with juvenile diabetes

Leukemia–The five-year survival rate for Leukemia is 60%-80%.

Over such a prolonged period key emotional and cognitive developmental stages may be reached.
Key factors:
1.) Limit pain
2.) Emotional support helps with development
3.) Mental engagement is important so that recovering children don’t fall massively behind.

Muscular Dystrophy

1.) Ensure your child is being worked with by an Assistive Technologist, Occupational Therapist, and school Psychologist.
2.) Make sure that teachers understand that fatigue, clumsy or slow movement, or slurred words are health issues, not behavioral issues.
3.) Remember your child is still a child with normal interests and dreams.

Sight impaired

1.) Seek out an assistive technologist if impairment persists after help from an eye doctor. It’s hard to learn if you can’t see!

Hearing impaired

1.) Seek out ENT’s and assistive technologists to help your child. It’s hard to learn if you can’t hear!

Special developmental needs

Many developmental delays can be spotted in a child’s first year of life. Children develop at different rates, but these are the rough ages a child should reach certain milestones.

Motor skills

3 months:
1.) Lift head and chest when on stomach
2.) Follow people and moving objects with eyes
3.) Grasp rattle when given to her.

6 months:
1.) Reach for and grasp for objects
2.) Roll over
3.) Sit with little support
12 months:
1.) Drink from cup with help
2.) Crawl
3.) Walk with help

Sensory and thinking skills

3 months:
1.) Recognize bottle or breast
2.) Turn head to bright colors or sound of human voice

6 months:
1.) Imitate familiar actions.
2.) Open mouth for spoon.

12 months:
1.) Try to accomplish simple goals.
2.) Copy sounds and actions you make.

Language and social skills

3 months:
1.) Communicate fear, hunger, or discomfort.
2.) Smile when smiled at.

6 months:
1.) Smile at self in mirror.
2.) Know familiar faces.
3.) Babble. Sing-song noises.

12 months:
1.) Try to “talk” with you.
2.) Understand simple commands.
3.) Show apprehension at strangers, affection to familiar adults.

Tips for dealing with Special Developmental Needs:

Autism: 1/110
Autism spectrum disorder ranges from mild lack of social understanding, to non-verbal

Early signs:
1.) Not responding to name by 12 months.
2.) Delayed speech and language skills.
3.) Avoiding eye contact.
4.) upset with small changes in routine.

Tips:
1.) Get an evaluation as early as possible.
2.) Utilize school psychologist, and occupational therapist.
3.) Create a “safe” zone where the child can be alone and relax at home.
4.) Pay attention to child’s hypersensitivity.

Dyslexia: 1/5
Dyslexia is very taxing, taking at least 5% more energy to process basic tasks. Those with dyslexia have much to offer, however, with dyslexia sufferers often being above average IQ and highly creative.

Early Signs:
1.) Appears bright, but unable to read at grade level.
2.) Tests well orally, but not on written tests.
3.) Seems to “daydream” a lot.

Tips:
1.) Read advanced material. This engages both sides of the brain.
2.) Don’t stress the misreading of “little” words (in, i’m, none, he). They will outgrow such mistakes.
3.) Discussion, discussion, discussion.

Many students with developmental delays are actually very gifted. Don’t stress the little mistakes, let them show you what they can do.

Special Behavioral/Emotional Needs

Students with behavioral/emotional needs are more than capable of learning, but their disabilities need management so they don’t distract themselves or the entire class.
–Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD): 1/200
–Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome (PTSD): 1/20
–Anxiety Disorders:

Overall tips:
1.) Learn more about your students specific illness, what caused it, what type of therapy they’re attending, and so on.
2.) Learn about the student’s strengths. Pull these out. Positive reinforcement works.
3.) Set very clear behavioral rules on the entire class or family.

Support the inclusion of all types of children and celebrate their talents. Most of all, don’t forget they’re just kids.

Thank you to Masters in Special Education for this information:

Link to Masters in Education.com

Citations

– http://www.healthfinder.gov/HealthAtoZ/Letter/e

– http://specialchildren.about.com/od/medicalissues/tp/Medical-Diagnosis-Index-A-B.htm

– http://www.cincinnatichildrens.org/patients/child/special-needs/medical/disabilities/default/

– http://www.cancer.org/cancer/leukemiainchildren/detailedguide/childhood-leukemia-survival-rates

– http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/fcs/pdfs/NC08.pdf

– http://www.aafa.org/display.cfm?id=9&sub=30

– http://www.kidsgetarthritistoo.org/about-ja/the-basics/genetic-arthritis.php

– http://www.shs.d211.org/science/faculty/bms/findocbio.pdf

– http://www.shs.d211.org/science/faculty/bms/findocbio.pdf

– http://www.disabilitysa.org/content-files/USAA%20Foundation%20-%20Children%20with%20Special%20Needs.pdf

– http://specialed.about.com/cs/idea/a/faq1.htm

– http://ms.about.com/od/multiplesclerosis101/p/ms_risk_factors.htm

– http://nichcy.org/disability/milestones

– http://www.p12.nysed.gov/specialed/autism/ASDbrochure.htm

– http://www.dosomething.org/tipsandtools/11-facts-about-dyslexia

– http://www.dyslexia.com/library/symptoms.htm

– http://www.ocfoundation.org/prevalence.aspx

– http://www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/pages/ptsd_in_children_and_adolescents_overview_for_professionals.asp

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