How to Write a Parental Concerns Letter for your IEP

Have you written a “Parental Concerns” letter?

No? Why Not???

This is one of the most underutilized sections in the IEP!

It is your right to submit your concerns as the parent of a child with an IEP, and have it placed into that IEP under the heading of “Parental Concerns,” or sometimes it’s listed as “Parent Input.” And yet so many times I hear parents say they didn’t know they had that right.

I’ll admit, it is very hard to find this portion of the IEP, as it is often the smallest section possible and is easily overlooked. OR, there may be a few well chosen snippets of your concerns that were picked out of the meeting by the case manager.

What does the IDEA say about including the parents input into the IEP? Well it’s not a lot, but it IS there; listed under Other Methods To Ensure Parent Participation (300.322(c)) “Parents are free to provide input into their child’s IEP through a written request if they so choose.”

Why is the Parents Concerns letter so important?

First, understand that you NEED to do this EVERYtime you go through the IEP process, or review.

Remember that the IEP is based on the “NEEDS” of the child. It is “NEEDS” driven. NOT diagnosis driven. So your child gets evaluated to determine the areas of need, then goals are drawn up based upon those needs. The strategies and services that they then receive are based upon the goals, which are based upon the needs. All of the child’s areas of need are listed in the “Present Levels” section, also known as the PLOP or PLAAP, adn this drives the IEP. Now, do you know what else is in that section of the IEP? The PARENTAL CONCERNS! (Note: this may be slightly different and vary from state to state).

Therefore, do you understand…. this “parental Concerns” section ALSO helps drive the goals & services in the IEP. It is your right to submit one, and it MUST be included!

How long should my “Parental Concerns” letter be?

The short answer is…. As long as it needs to be. Now, some districts may tell you that it can not be any longer than 200 words. That is NOT TRUE! They may have a computer program for IEP formulation that only allows for 200 words, but that does not mean you have to limit your concerns. It simply means they need to find another way to include your concerns IN THEIR ENTIRETY into the IEP as you request. Of course that doesn’t mean you should write a 12 page dissertation about your child either. Be clear and concise, leave out emotional statements or accusatory language targeting any staff or service.

Here’s what you should include in your “Parental Concerns.”

Everything that “needs” to be there. Remember, this will drive goals and services. What are your main concerns about your child? Be concise. Be focused. Be child centered.

  • areas of need that the school identified and you agree with
  • areas of need that have not been identified that you wish to include
  • strategies that work for your child
  • strategies that feel do not work
  • behavior concerns
  • any medical or food allergies you are concerned or feel the staff needs to know
  • social and emotional struggles your child may have. ie. anxiety or fidgety do to ADHD etc…

When do you send a “Parental Concerns” letter?

I recommend that you send it in when you are responding to the letter of notification for your next meeting. “Yes, I can attend the meeting on Thursday, date, time. Here is my list of parental concerns that I wish to discuss with the team and be included in their entirety within the IEP.”

You can follow that up with, “I will bring a hard copy to the meeting,” or “I will email a copy for input into the IEP.”

For further assistance with Special Education and the IEP process’

Contact IEP Coach/Advocate Linda by calling (973) 534-3402

Visit us on Facebook: Special Needs IEP Coach/Advocate

IEP Coach/Advocacy

“Cc: 3 people on every email.”

This was one of the best pieces of advice Linda gave us and we hadn’t even signed a contract with her yet!

My son has been in the public school system since he was three years old. After being asked to leave multiple daycares, one owner suggested we contact our school district’s CST and have him tested. He was tested and was deemed eligible for their special needs pre-school program. He started with half-days and transitioned to full days.

As parents, we thought we were doing the best for him. We had our IEP meeting and everything was great. Boy do I wish I knew what was ahead of me!!!

Kindergarten started off okay, but then he was put on home instruction because he was a “public health” risk. I had hired a different advocate then, but she didn’t do a thing for me. I even contacted a special needs attorney who offered advice and we were able to get him back into school.

First grade, again started off okay, but then it went downhill. At one of the many meetings with the school, we raised the question of out of district placement. Oh no, we were told. Multiple times that year, while being summoned to the school to pick up our son due to his current behaviors, arriving and being shuttled into an impromptu meeting, we would say, perhaps out of district placement is the answer and we were told No, we have not done everything we can for him yet.

In the spring, I contacted Linda. Best thing we could have ever done. At our first meeting, she gave me so much information and I thought to myself, I had no idea that I was the person in control of my son’s IEP meetings. Linda took the time to review all of my son’s records and ask what we wanted for our son. Together, we devised a plan to fight for our child and the education he deserved. Linda is a bulldog. She knows how to ask the tough questions that parents don’t want to ask or know to ask. She is upfront and always responsive.

Months and months of meetings and emails and unfulfilled requests, we wound up in court. We had no choice. Days before my son was supposed to start his new school, I was still getting “bullied” by the school district and administrators.

My son has been in his new school since the end of November and he is doing outstanding. He was named “Student of the Month” this past month and received his first report card – all A’s and B’s. He has not been sent home once! When his teacher calls me for a weekly status update, she is nothing but positive. We could not be happier and more proud of our child. We credit a lot of people, but without Linda, our son would not be in the proper educational atmosphere, he would not be as successful as he is and I would not have my sanity.

Get yourselves educated. Know your child’s rights and your rights as parents. Understand that they are not in control of your child’s educational future, you are. Hire an advocate (IEP Coach/advocate Linda’s email specialneedsnj@hotmail.com and website www.specialneedsnewjersey.com) who understands the special educational system. School administrators take advantage of the that fact parents do not know all the ins and outs of how the system works and for many, including myself, there is so much more than just that little PRISE book they give you at the meeting.

Stand your ground. Ask questions. Ask for documentation and communication in written form. Control the conversation and the meetings. And most importantly, every communication should include at least people!!!!!

Nicole K.

Nicole is one of the parents I have served through IEP Coaching and Advocacy. You will be hearing more of her story in future posts.

If your child is struggling in Special Education, you need to learn the ins-and-outs of Special Education, have questions about what the PRISE booklet is all about, or have a newly diagnosed or classified child in your family…. Contact me at (973) 534-3402 or send an email to specialneedsnj@hotmail.com, or go to my website and fill in the contact/request form www.specialneedsnewjersey.com. NOTE: Don’t let the NJ part put you off, I serve ALL states! The laws of the IDEA are national! Some practices, policies, and timelines vary state to state, but YOUR RIGHTS and the rights of YOUR CHILD are the same across ALL borders! (NJ is simply where I am located and it was the best available domain when I started.)

I hope to hear from you soon to learn how I can help you help your child.

Coach Linda

IEP REVIEW SPECIAL

Get your IEP review!   30% off

Contact me at linda@darknesstojoy.com or specialneedsnj@hotmail.com to request your special price.

ONLY $97.99
(That’s 30% off the regular price!)

What you get:

  • Complete Review of your child’s IEP
  • Your top 3 concerns or questions answered
  • A 50 minute consultation via phone, Skype, or face-time
  • Expert advice and tips
  • How to approach the CST team
  • What letters to write and how

ADVOCATE-ON-CALL

Need an Advocate? Or just need some information??

Our ADVOCATE-ON-CALL service is for parents that may think they don’t need a full contracted Advocate, or just need a bit of advice for their upcoming meeting etc…

Special Needs NJ is now offering an ADVOCATE -ON-CALL session at reduced price for the holiday season!!

Just go to the “contact” page, fill out the form which will send us an email of your request. We’ll be in touch with you to set up your one hour ADVOCATE-ON-CALL session. Or just call us at (973) 534-3402

For one hour; you can ask any and all questions you have and get expert advice as to how to proceed. You’ll be educated as to what questions to ask you CST, what to sign and not sign, tricks and traps to be weary of, what to avoid, how to request, and so so much more!

You can also pay for your ADVOCATE-ON-CALL session right here on our site through PayPal! It’s that easy.

Having difficulty with your school system? Can’t get the services you think your child should have? Do you have to attend an IEP meeting and are not sure how to handle the CST?

We will give you all the information in one phone call.

 

Parent Coaching/Family Coaching

Parent Coaching / Family Coaching

You owe it to your child….

Does your family struggle with a behaviorally challenging child? Is everything a battle? Does your child feel unseen, bullied, lack meaningful friendships, having trouble socially, and or academically?

Linda is a credentialed professional in Special Education, Behavioral interventions, and parent coaching. She has many years of ABA experience, teaching, tutoring, mental health management, as well as life experience to guide and assist you with your child/ family and the day to day problem behaviors.

When addressing parenting and family related problems, only someone that has experienced the same concerns that you face can effectively assist you. Licenses as well as certifications are but part of the equation to problem resolution. Real-world experience is invaluable in this regard…


Your family and/or child 
 Needs Help if…

Is someone in your family diagnosed with….

  • Autism/Asperger’s
  • ADHD/ADD
  • Anxiety
  • Have an IEP
  • Depression
  • Bipolar Disorder, (IED) Intermittent Explosive Disorder
  • Personality Disorder
  • Academic Difficulties in reading
  • Been Bullied
  • Have social phobia’s
  • Social Skills Disorders
  • etc…

Parent Coaching for the family by a Behavioral Expert

 Nationally: Phone Consultations / Video Chat/ Skye/ Face Time services available

Records Review and IEP consultations are available by appointment

In Person Consultations available in by appointment

 Behavior Analysis and Professional training:

–    Applied Behavior Analysis

–    Positive Behavioral Supports

–    Teaching Family Model

–    Case Review

–   Treatment plan development and more…

  • online and phone supports
Professional Parent and Family Coaching sessions are for :

Mothers

Fathers

Foster and Stepparents

Grandparents

Siblings and Other Caregivers

 It’s up to ALL of us to make the changes! Don’t wait for what you think is the right time… “I need better insurance, can’t afford the help, maybe he/she will grow out of it…”

Is that internet service, video game subscription, cable TV, cell phone, dinner out at the fast food joint, movie, or even vacation more important than the health of your family?

Invest in the future of our children.

Now’s the time.

We can’t have another child die from being neglected, and families suffer horrible consequences. Don’t be that guy who says…. “if he/she only got the right help.”

GET HELP NOW…call 973-534-3402

to make an apoointment

For additional information please contact us at… specialneedsnj@hotmail.com

or fill in your contact information and we will call you

Special Education Parent Advocate

Linda Leenstra, Special Education Parent Advocate

Linda wants you to ……

relax bitmoji

Advocacy to parents understanding your child’s Individual Education Plan (IEP), which includes:  A. Interpretation, B.Preparation C. Monitoring and observation, D. Meeting attendance, E. Letter Writing, etc…

Contact Linda:

(973) 534-3402

A guide to Section 504

I found this wonderfully written article on the 504 plan by Mary Durheim

section 504
A parent’s guide to Section 504 in public schools
This important civil rights law can provide educational benefits to kids with learning disabilities and/or ADHD in public schools.
by: Mary Durheim | December 16, 2016

Section 504 — just what exactly is it? You’ve probably heard about it, but every school district addresses Section 504 in a different manner. Some districts have even been heard to say, “We don’t do that in this district.” But in fact, compliance to Section 504, which is a federal statute, is not optional. This article attempts to answer basic questions pertaining to the implementation of Section 504 in public school systems.

What is Section 504?

Section 504 is a part of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 that prohibits discrimination based upon disability. Section 504 is an anti-discrimination, civil rights statute that requires the needs of students with disabilities to be met as adequately as the needs of the non-disabled are met.
Section 504 states that: “No otherwise qualified individual with a disability in the United States, as defined in section 706(8) of this title, shall, solely by reason of her or his disability, be excluded from the participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance…” [29 U.S.C. §794(a), 34 C.F.R. §104.4(a)].

Who is covered under Section 504?

To be covered under Section 504, a student must be “qualified ” (which roughly equates to being between 3 and 22 years of age, depending on the program, as well as state and federal law, and must have a disability) [34 C.F.R. §104.3(k)(2)].
Who is an “individual with a disability”?
As defined by federal law: “An individual with a disability means any person who: (i) has a mental or physical impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activity; (ii) has a record of such an impairment; or (iii) is regarded as having such an impairment” [34 C.F.R. §104.3(j)(1)].

What is an “impairment” as used under the Section 504 definition?
An impairment as used in Section 504 may include any disability, long-term illness, or various disorder that “substantially” reduces or lessens a student’s ability to access learning in the educational setting because of a learning-, behavior- or health-related condition. [“It should be emphasized that a physical or mental impairment does not constitute a disability for purposes of Section 504 unless its severity is such that it results in a substantial limitation of one or more major life activities” (Appendix A to Part 104, #3)].
Many students have conditions or disorders that are not readily apparent to others. They may include conditions such as specific learning disabilities, diabetes, epilepsy and allergies. Hidden disabilities such as low vision, poor hearing, heart disease or chronic illness may not be obvious, but if they substantially limit that child’s ability to receive an appropriate education as defined by Section 504, they may be considered to have an “impairment” under Section 504 standards. As a result, these students, regardless of their intelligence, will be unable to fully demonstrate their ability or attain educational benefits equal to that of non-disabled students (The Civil Rights of Students with Hidden Disabilities under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973—Pamphlet). The definition does not set forth a list of specific diseases, conditions or disorders that constitute impairments because of the difficulty of ensuring the comprehensiveness of any such list. While the definition of a disabled person also includes specific limitations on what persons are classified as disabled under the regulations, it also specifies that only physical and mental impairments are included, thus “environmental, cultural and economic disadvantage are not in themselves covered” (Appendix A to Part 104, #3).

What are “major life activities”?

Major life activities include, but are not limited to: self-care, manual tasks, walking, seeing, speaking, sitting, thinking, learning, breathing, concentrating, interacting with others and working. As of January 1, 2009 with the re-authorization of the Americans with Disabilities Amendment Act, this list has been expanded to also include the life activities of reading, concentrating, standing, lifting, bending, etc. This may include individuals with AD/HD, dyslexia, cancer, diabetes, severe allergies, chronic asthma, Tourette ’s syndrome, digestive disorders, cardiovascular disorders, depression, conduct disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, HIV/AIDS, behavior disorders and temporary disabilities (e.g., broken writing arm, broken leg, etc.). Conditions that are episodic or in remission are also now covered if they create a substantial limitation in one or more major life activity while they are active. Students who are currently using illegal drugs or alcohol are not covered or eligible under Section 504.

What does “substantially limits” mean?

Substantially limits is not defined in the federal regulations. However, in a letter from the Office for Civil Rights (OCR), they state, “this is a determination to be made by each local school district and depends on the nature and severity of the person’s disabling condition.” New guidance from the Americans with Disabilities Amendment Act states that Section 504 standards must conform with the ADAAA and is “intended to afford a broad scope of protection to eligible persons.” In considering substantial limitations, students must be measured against their same age, non-disabled peers in the general population and without benefit of medication or other mitigating measures such as learned behavioral or adaptive neurological modifications, assistive technology or accommodations.

504
Who can refer a child for consideration for evaluation under Section 504?

Anyone can refer a child for evaluation under Section 504. However, while anyone can make a referral, such as parents or a doctor, OCR has stated in a staff memorandum that “the school district must also have reason to believe that the child is in need of services under Section 504 due to a disability” (OCR Memorandum, April 29, 1993). Therefore, a school district does not have to refer or evaluate a child under Section 504 solely upon parental demand. The key to a referral is whether the school district staff suspects that the child is suffering from a mental or physical impairment that substantially limits a major life activity and is in need of either regular education with supplementary services or special education and related services [letter to Mentink, 19 IDELR 1127 (OCR) 1993]. If a parent requests a referral for evaluation, and the school district refuses, the school district must provide the parent with notice of their procedural rights under Section 504.
Who decides whether a student is qualified and eligible for services under Section 504?
According to the federal regulations: “…placement decisions are to be made by a group of persons who are knowledgeable about the child, the meaning of the evaluation data, placement options, least restrictive environment requirements, and comparable facilities” [34 C.F.R. §104.35(c)(3)].
Unlike Special Education, the federal regulations for Section 504 do not require or even mention that parents are to be a part of the decision-making committee. The decision to include parents in the decision-making committee is a determination that is made by each school district and should be spelled out in the district’s procedures for implementing Section 504. Parents should at least be asked and encouraged to contribute any information that they may have (e.g., doctor’s reports, outside testing reports, etc.) that would be helpful to the Section 504 committee in making their determination of what the child may need. Schools are expected to make sound educational decisions as to what the child needs in order to receive an appropriate education.

What information is used in doing an evaluation under Section 504?

Under Section 504, no formalized testing is required. The 504 Committee should look at grades over the past several years, teacher’s reports, information from parents or other agencies, state assessment scores or other school administered tests, observations, discipline reports, attendance records, health records and adaptive behavior information. Schools must consider a variety of sources. A single source of information (such as a doctor’s report) cannot be the only information considered. Schools must be able to assure that all information submitted is documented and considered.

Can my child be placed under Section 504 without my knowledge?

NO. Parents must always be given notice before their child is evaluated and/or placed under Section 504 (34 C.F.R. §104.36). Parents must also be given a copy of their child’s Section 504 accommodation plan if the committee determines that the child is eligible under Section 504.

What types of accommodations will my child receive if determined eligible under Section 504?

Each child’s needs are determined individually. Determination of what is appropriate for each child is based on the nature of the disabling condition and what that child needs in order to have an equal opportunity to compete when compared to the non-disabled. There is no guarantee of A’s or B’s or even that the student will not fail. Students are still expected to produce. The ultimate goal of education for all students, with or without disabilities, is to give students the knowledge and compensating skills they will need to be able to function in life after graduation.
Accommodations that may be used, but are not limited to, include:
• Highlighted textbooks
• Extended time on tests or assignments
• Peer assistance with note taking
• Frequent feedback
• Extra set of textbooks for home use
• Computer aided instruction
• Enlarged print
• Positive reinforcements
• Behavior intervention plans
• Rearranging class schedules
• Visual aids
• Preferred seating assignments
• Taping lectures
• Oral tests
• Individual contracts

Will my child still be in the regular classroom or will he be in a “special class”?

A Section 504 eligible child will always be in the regular classroom unless (according to federal regulations): “… the student with a disability is so disruptive in a regular classroom that the education of other students is significantly impaired, then the needs of the student with a disability cannot be met in that environment. Therefore, regular placement would not be appropriate to his or her needs and would not be required by §104.34” (34 C.F.R. §104.34, Appendix A, #24).

Can my child still be disciplined under Section 504?

Yes. Children under Section 504 are still expected to follow the district’s student code of conduct. However, when disciplining a child under Section 504, schools must consider the relationship between the disability and the misbehavior if the child is going to be removed from the regular setting for longer than 10 days. This does not mean that a student with a disability cannot be sent to a discipline center or that they cannot go to in-school suspension, or be suspended from school for three days. Very strict guidelines exist for schools in discipline issues with students who have a disability under Section 504. Your campus or district 504 coordinator can assist you in this area should you have additional questions concerning the discipline of students with disabilities. Children having disabilities with behavioral components should have individual discipline plans as well as behavior intervention plans.

If I disagree with the school’s evaluation, will the school district pay for an outside independent evaluation?

Under Section 504, schools are not required to pay for an outside independent evaluation. If a parent disagrees with the school’s evaluation decision, they may request a due process hearing or file a complaint with the Office for Civil Rights. (Ask your district or campus for a copy of Notice of Parent and Student Rights Under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.)

504 vs IEP
How often will my child be re-evaluated?

While there are no specific time lines on this issue, students must be re-evaluated at least every three years or whenever there is going to be a “significant change in placement.” The campus 504 committee should re-evaluate your child’s plan every year to make sure that his or her accommodation plan is appropriate based on their current schedule and individual needs. The accommodation plan may be revised at any time during the school year if needed.

Will my child still be able to participate in nonacademic services?

Yes. Districts must provide equal opportunity in areas such as counseling, physical education and/or athletics, transportation, health services, recreational activities, and special interest groups or clubs. However, the “no pass, no play ” standard used for students in most states also applies to students under Section 504 (34 C.F.R. §104.37).

What are my rights as a parent under Section 504?

As a parent or legal guardian, you have the right to:
1. Receive notice regarding the identification, evaluation and/or placement of your child;
2. Examine relevant records pertaining to your child;
3. Request an impartial hearing with respect to the district’s actions regarding the identification evaluation, or placement of your child, with an opportunity for the parent/guardian to participate in the hearing, to have representation by an attorney, and have a review procedure;
4. File a complaint with your school District Section 504 Coordinator, who will investigate the allegations regarding Section 504 matters other than your child’s identification, evaluation and placement.
5. File a complaint with the appropriate regional Office for Civil Rights. For additional information, contact: U.S. Department of Education, Washington, D.C. 20202-1100
(800) 421-3481
http://www.ed.gov/ocr
E-mail: ocr@ed.gov

Do I contact the State Education Agency (SEA) if I have a complaint concerning Section 504?

No. The State Education Agency has no direct jurisdiction over Section 504 implementation. Complaints may be addressed to your local District 504 Coordinator or to the Office for Civil Rights.

 

 

 

If you feel you may need an advocate for your child’s educational services; contact Linda at 973-534-3402

 

 

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One note of caution: Please do not substitute this information for independent and individual legal advice. Such advice should be sought from a licensed, qualified attorney in the field of Section 504 disabilities. Every situation is different, and a good assessment of the risks involved in your particular situation can only be determined by consulting with your attorney and providing him or her with all of the relevant factual data. Sometimes just one “minor” detail can make a material difference in the outcome of a case.

What’s an IEP?

IEPIn New Jersey, as well as other states across the country, an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) is a written document that outlines a child’s (with a special need or disability) education, ages 3-21.  The plan is tailored specifically to the individual student, so they receive maximum educational benefit.  The key word is individual.  A program that is appropriate for one student, may not be right for another.

For a child with a disability, the IEP is the cornerstone for their education.  It identifies the services that a child needs so that he/she can grow and learn during the school year in a manner that recognizes their disability and challenges.  An IEP is also a legal document that outlines three key topics:

  • The child’s special education plan that includes their goals for the school year
  • Services needed to help the child reach those goals
  • A strategy to evaluate the student’s success and progress

Who Qualifies For An IEP

Two conditions must be met in order for a child to be eligible for an IEP:

  1. An evaluation. Parents, teachers, school counselors, or anyone who suspects a student is struggling in school can request an evaluation of the student. A school psychologist or other professional may give your child various tests and evaluate them in the classroom.  The evaluation must be comprehensive and must look at all of the following:
  • Health
  • Vision
  • Social and emotional development
  • Learning potential
  • Academic performance
  • Communication skills
  • Motor skills
  1. A decision. Upon completion of the evaluation the IEP team who evaluated your child will decide whether or not they need special education services in order to learn the curriculum.  If your child is found eligible for an IEP, then the next step is to create the IEP specific to your child.

IEP Meeting    team work

To develop an IEP for your child, your local education agency officials and others involved in your child’s educational program meet to discuss education related goals.  According to law(s), the following individuals must be invited to the IEP meeting:

  • You (the parent/guardian)
  • Your child’s teacher
  • A local education agency representative
  • Your child
  • Other individuals at your discretion (your child’s doctor, etc.)

Takeaways

Upon completion of your first IEP meeting, your school system and all attending parties of the meeting will work together to make sure the IEP rollout is smooth and followed each and every day throughout the academic year.  Goals will be monitored to ensure they are met, and measurements and progress will be reported to you.

After some time, you may also be asked to partake in additional IEP meetings throughout the course of the academic year.  Here the associated parties from the original IEP meeting will give you updates and recommendations to change certain factors of your child’s plan.  This ensures that the goals continue to be met.  During these meetings the team leader will write a statement about your child’s present level of academic and functional performance and goals.  The statement is based on what you and the team have discussed in the meeting(s).  All changes to the IEP will be documented, and noted that all parties have agreed to the changes.

In conclusion, an IEP is the cornerstone of your child’s special education program, and it should always reflect your child’s strengths, needs and progress as he/she moves through school.  Always remember, as the parent/guardian, you are a very important member of your child’s IEP team, and bring valuable insights and concerns to the table.

Also remember it is also up to your IEP team and other school officials to help monitor your child to make sure that he/she is not being bullied in school because of their special need or disability.  For tips to avoid school bullying for individuals with special needs and disabilities

Need an advocate?

Call (973) 534-3402 to speak with Ms. Linda today

or

Fill out this form to send an email request

Time to Evaluate?

 

Independent Educational Evaluations IEE

IEE

Pursuant to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, a parent of a child with a disability who disagrees with the school district’s evaluation of the child is entitled to request the performance of an independent education evaluation (“IEE”) of the child at public expense.  (Notably, an evaluation may consist of multiple “assessments.”)  You may request assessments not performed by the district (i.e., if you disagree that the district performed the appropriate assessments in the first place), and the district cannot then go back and do their own assessment before responding to your request.  Once you submit your request, the district has twenty (20) days to respond.  Its only proper responses are either(i) to agree to perform the IEE (which must be without unreasonable conditions), or (ii) to initiate a due process hearing in the Office of Administrative Law, at which the district would have to prove that its initial assessments were appropriate.

iee (1)