How to Discipline a Child: Part II

How to Discipline a Child: Part II

Natural and Logical Consequences

The use of natural consequences involves letting the results of behavior provide a learning experience.

When responding to inappropriate behavior a logical consequence is one that fits the behavior.

Example of Natural Consequence:

The child forgets his homework. Instead of bringing it to school, the parent allows him to experience the consequences of missing recess and/or having to do it over.

 
Example of Logical Consequence:

 

After telling your child NOT to ride her bike in the street, she does so anyway. The parent takes her bike away for a specific time period.

  • Allows children to take responsibility for their actions
  • Use consequences in combination with positive techniques
  • Follow through with consequence promptly
  • Be consistent; empty threats do not work

NOTE: These approaches cannot be used in situations where the safety of the child or another person is a concern.

Provide a Functional Communication System ~ Behavior is Communication

Without a functional way to communicate needs, wants and feelings, a child will become frustrated.

Negative behaviors can be the child’s attempt to make others aware of his needs, wants and feelings.

  • If a young child cannot express that he is hungry or thirsty, simple sign language may enable him to convey these basic needs
  • An older student who has no way to participate in class discussions is likely to act out to gain the attention of his teacher and classmates
  • Assistive technology may be needed by some children

Teach Replacement Behaviors ~ Provides the child with more appropriate responses

Gives the child a better, more acceptable way to behave; replaces undesirable behaviors with more acceptable ones.

  • Teaches the child other options
  • Acknowledges that the traditional telling the child to just “stop the behavior” will not be effective because the child does not know an alternative way to behave
  • This strategy can include providing the child with scripts for common situations
  • Can also include teaching the child to use visual imagery, such as a stop sign
  • If a child curses when angry, provide more appropriate words to use

Are you struggling with disciplining your child?

For Professional help contact Specialneedsnj@hotmail.com or call (973)534-3402

 

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